Archive for April, 2012


(via The amazing plant photographs which were ten years in the making and are filled with electricity | Mail Online)

Some stunningly (sorry) beautiful pictures of various plants with 80,000 volts of electricity running across them. Through a fascinating process described in the article, Robert Buelteman laid plants on an aluminum plate that floated in liquid silicone, ran the electricity through them and then photographed them with a minute light from a fiber-optic cable to ran over the plants. He even would direct electricity to certain areas using a wand and car battery. Beautiful mesh of art and science.











ianbrooks:

Metal Insect Sculptures by Elizabeth Goluch

Elizabeth’s lifelike insect and spider sculptures incorporate metal, gold, silver, enamel, and a little slice of steampunk. You are highly advised to check out her website to see all the amazing details I couldnt post here, as most of her clockwork bugs have movable parts and secret compartments that reveal hidden flourishes (the Dragonfly, for instance, hides a dragon beneath its wings while the ladybug houses a tiny house inside of it. SO GO LOOKS).

(via: lostateminor)

Whoa. These are cool. And they have little parts in them that go along with their names! Even better.

Art + Science = Awesome

(via The amazing plant photographs which were ten years in the making and are filled with electricity | Mail Online)

Some stunningly (sorry) beautiful pictures of various plants with 80,000 volts of electricity running across them. Through a fascinating process described in the article, Robert Buelteman laid plants on an aluminum plate that floated in liquid silicone, ran the electricity through them and then photographed them with a minute light from a fiber-optic cable to ran over the plants. He even would direct electricity to certain areas using a wand and car battery. Beautiful mesh of art and science.

ianbrooks:

Metal Insect Sculptures by Elizabeth Goluch

Elizabeth’s lifelike insect and spider sculptures incorporate metal, gold, silver, enamel, and a little slice of steampunk. You are highly advised to check out her website to see all the amazing details I couldnt post here, as most of her clockwork bugs have movable parts and secret compartments that reveal hidden flourishes (the Dragonfly, for instance, hides a dragon beneath its wings while the ladybug houses a tiny house inside of it. SO GO LOOKS).

(via: lostateminor)

Whoa. These are cool. And they have little parts in them that go along with their names! Even better.

Art + Science = Awesome


quantumaniac:

How Much Does Fire Weigh? 

Question: Since fire is a plasma, and plasma is a state of matter, and matter is defined as anything that has mass, would that then mean that fire has mass and weight to it? If so, is there a way to measure its weight? How much space would, say, a pound of fire take up?

AnswerIt weighs more than nothing, but if you’re at the bottom of a pillar of fire, being crushed should be your second concern

Fires, putting aside details about plasma and chemicals or whatever, is just hot air.  For a given pressure the ideal gas law says that the density of a gas is inversely proportional to temperature, in Kelvin.  You can use this fact, the temperature and density of air (300°K 1.3 kg/m3), and the temperature of your average run-of-the-mill open flame (about 1300°K) to find the density of fire. For most “everyday” fires, the density of the gas in the flame will be about 1/4 the density of air.  So, since air (at sea level) weighs about 1.3 kg per cubic meter (1.3 grams per liter), fire weighs about 0.3 kg per cubic meter.

One pound of ordinary fire, here on Earth near sea level, would take up a cube about 1.2 meters to a side.  The reason that fires always flow upward is that its density is lower than air.  So, fire rises in air for the same reason that bubbles rise in water: it’s buoyant.  Enterprising individuals sometimes even take advantage of that fact.

If you were on a planet with no air at all, fire would fall to the ground instead of rise because, like all matter, it’s pulled by gravity.  Also, it would be hard to keep the fire going (what with there being no air).

Well that’s fascinating. Not sure if being crushed or burnt to death would be worse!


scienceisbrilliant:

Plant Communication –  According to new German research, plants send out airborne GLV compounds when distressed. “They found that when these plants are attacked by tobacco hornworm caterpillars,Manduca sexta, the caterpillars’ saliva causes a chemical change in the GLV compounds the plants had produced. These modified compounds then attract predatory “true bugs,”Geocoris, which prey on hornworm eggs and young larvae. Although more research will be needed to figure out exactly how the molecules in the caterpillar saliva cause this change in the GLVs, it’s clear that the caterpillars themselves cause the change in the GLV signal, the researchers say. It may thus be possible someday to induce the same sort of change via genetic engineering, which might protect plants against pests without encouraging the resistance that pests develop in response to pesticides.”


However, some people believe it is much more likely the predators have evolved to detected the GLV compounds to hunt prey. 
http://io9.com/5623112/the-smell-of-freshly+cut-grass-is-actually-a-plant-distress-call 

Whether the plant evolved to attract predators of its attacker or the predators evolved to associate the GLV compounds with dinnertime, evolution is incredible.


jtotheizzoe:

genannetics:

So many things are right with this picture.

Ya heard?