Archive for May, 2012


kqedscience:

The International Space Station’s humanoid robot helper, Robonaut 2, reaches out to touch a gloved astronaut hand in a photo that pays tribute to Michelangelo’s Sistine ceiling painting.


CREDIT: NASA 

kqedscience:

The International Space Station’s humanoid robot helper, Robonaut 2, reaches out to touch a gloved astronaut hand in a photo that pays tribute to Michelangelo’s Sistine ceiling painting.


CREDIT: NASA 

Written In DNA


jtotheizzoe:

I mean that quite literally. Harvard nanosculptors have developed a technique to stack “bricks” of DNA (essentially small sequence blocks) into defined shapes. By altering which DNA tiles go into a mix, different complex forms can be assembled, including these letters, numbers and characters!

Check out Ed Yong’s full post written in the genotypeface, and his full piece at Nature News.


(via Not Exactly Rocket Science)

Atomic movies and DNA font, it has been a good day for creating new letters with awesome science!

Physicists make a small movie. Atomically small.

Link: Physicists make a small movie. Atomically small.

Physicists work some movie magic by doing cool stuff with lasers and rubidium atoms and you really just need to read the article. Possible applications: A movie theater for bacteria and quantum computer advances. Mostly the latter.

An autonomous car test was carried out in Spain last week by Project SARTRE (Safe Road Trains for the Environment). Working with Volvo, they have developed a reliable ability for cars to join with a “platoon” of other cars following the leader. While part of the group, the car completely takes over driving, keeping a 10 to 50 ft distance from the car in front of it. In this test, a truck and 3 cars traveled 125 miles over the course of the day, using public highways at a cruising speed of about 53mph.

The project has three primary aims: convenience, safety, and efficiency. Obviously, being able to work or read or any number of things on long commutes is handy. Also, because a lot of people do that sort of thing anyway while driving, the system would be able to alleviate the danger of human error (to some degree). By allowing the cars to follow each other much more closely and maintain safety, it also increases the ability to save fuel through drafting. The amount of fuel saved is the focus of their next set of experiments.

Those moments you realize we live in the future.

jtotheizzoe:

Written In DNA

I mean that quite literally. Harvard nanosculptors have developed a technique to stack “bricks” of DNA (essentially small sequence blocks) into defined shapes. By altering which DNA tiles go into a mix, different complex forms can be assembled, including these letters, numbers and characters!

Check out Ed Yong’s full post written in the genotypeface, and his full piece at Nature News.


(via Not Exactly Rocket Science)

Atomic movies and DNA font, it has been a good day for creating new letters with awesome science!

Possible Mars transport: flying carpets?

Link: Possible Mars transport: flying carpets?

A few years ago a Harvard mathematician, L. Mahadevan, proposed that if we could get a surface to undulate similar to that of a ray along the seafloor it was mathematically possible to have our own flying carpets. Last fall Princeton grad Noah Jafferis put that idea to the test and designed a small model. Using plastic sheets that expand or contract dependent on electric charge delivered to several areas on the sheet, it could produce the wave motion necessary to stay afloat. 

This prototype has a limited range due to being tethered by the wires to deliver charge, but Jafferis hopes to include some sort of power source soon. On a larger scale, it isn’t very feasible; a 50 square foot sheet would be required to get a human a millimeter off the ground. Jafferis thinks that the lower gravity on Mars is a more practical application. Once we get over the whole getting to and living on Mars, that is.