Archive for August, 2012

Dark Matter In Rap Form

jtotheizzoe:

Coma Niddy drops the knowledge on ya about something funky in the universe. Download the tune here.

Please continue to make fun science raps for me, everyone.

“The universe is like bread and dark matter is the cheese.”

(by comaniddy)

The more science raps there are, the more awesome the world is. True fact.


Five holes blasted by Curiosity using its super-awesome laser on some Martian ground. Not only does it shoot, but it can break down the resulting plasma and determine what molecules are present.

]

Some eerily beautiful fluid dynamics in the form of slow-mo water balloons. They don’t break, and the rebound is sometimes even cooler than the initial impact.

To reflect the ongoing structural changes in the adolescent and twenty-something brain, many journalists and scientists use words and phrases like “unfinished,” “work in progress,” “under construction” and “half-baked.” Such language implies that the brain eventually reaches a kind of ideal state when it is “done.” But there is no final, optimal state. The human brain is not a soufflé that gradually expands over time and finally finishes baking at age 30. Yes, we can identify and label periods of dramatic development—or windows of heightened plasticity—but that should not eclipse the fact that brain changes throughout life.

[…]

Whether we can, at this moment in time, meaningfully link this life stage to neuroscience seems a tenuous proposition at best. By itself, brain biology does not dictate who we are. The members of any one age group are not reducible to a few distinguishing structural changes in the brain. Ultimately, the fact that a twenty-something has weaker bridges between various brain regions than someone in their thirties is not hugely important—it’s just one aspect of a far more complex identity.

The Neuroscience of 20-Somethings by Scientific American’s Ferris Jabr (via explore-blog)

As with most things related to the human condition, it is nearly impossible to describe it with one or two words. The brain, an incredibly complex organic computer, can certainly not be summed up by “half baked” at any stage.

Dark Matter in Rap Form

jtotheizzoe:

Dark Matter In Rap Form

Coma Niddy drops the knowledge on ya about something funky in the universe. Download the tune here.

Please continue to make fun science raps for me, everyone.

“The universe is like bread and dark matter is the cheese.”

(by comaniddy)

The more science raps there are, the more awesome the world is. True fact.


holymoleculesbatman:

Cobalt Chloride (Pink), Chrome Alum (Purple), Copper Nitrate (Blue), Copper Sulfate (Blue), Copper Acetate (Blue), Nickel Sulfate (Green), Potassium Chromate (Yellow), Cerium Sulfate (Yellow), Potassium Dichromate (Orange), Sodium Dichromate (Orange)

Five holes blasted by Curiosity using its super-awesome laser on some Martian ground. Not only does it shoot, but it can break down the resulting plasma and determine what molecules are present.


biologylair:

The genome of Monosiga brevicollis, the choanoflagellates photographed above, was recently sequenced.

Choanoflagellates,single-celled, aquatic, eukaryotic microbes are currently biological giants in unlocking the key to the evolutionary transition from unicellular to multicellular organisms, particularly in animals.

Sponges, or animals of the phylum Porifera , serve as the most primitive extant group of animals. (You can see this on this  previously posted phylogenetic tree of the history of life). Interestingly enough, aquatic sponges possess flagellated feeding structures  called choanocytes, which are nearly morphologically identical to the single-celled organisms we call choanoflagellates.

Photo Courtesy: National Science Foundation

A cool picture, that demonstrates an even cooler possibility: being able to eventually map the entire rise of modern life through genomic studies.

Previous Post

Some eerily beautiful fluid dynamics in the form of slow-mo water balloons. They don’t break, and the rebound is sometimes even cooler than the initial impact.


A beautiful map of the world’s rivers by National Geographic. It’s astounding to think that all of that only equates to less than 1% of the Earth’s water.

However, regardless of how much it appears to be, there are a whole lot of living things depending on it. Of them, only one is actively poisoning it for the rest of the biosphere and only one has the ability to clean it up. 

As we advance technologically our methods for fixing it are becoming more effective and less intrusive. At the same time, the amount of pollution being dumped is increasing also. 

While it would be great to develop a viable desalinization process, it’s not something we can count on any time soon. In the meantime, there are a diverse number of things you can do to help. Recycle, live more green, and use your rights as a citizen to elect representatives who understand and are willing to make the necessary changes to keep our water and environment safe.