neurosciencestuff:

All vertebrates’ eyes emerge from a single group of cells, called the eye field, located in the middle of the brain. The eye field cells evaginate to form two optic vesicles, which eventually give rise to two retinas, one on either side of the brain.

Eyes Emerge

Top image: In a ~5 somites embryo, eye field cells are stained red, and forebrain cells are outlined in green (upper left). A few hours later, in a ~10 somites embryo, the eye field (green) separates into two optic vesicles. At the same embryonic stage, the dorsal telencephalon, which sits atop the evaginating eyes, is labeled blue (bottom left). In both of these images, a midline positioned cross outlines the apical surface of the optic vesicles and the ventricular space. The animation follows the development of this same surface as the eyes emerge from the brain.

Sunrise in the Eye

Bottom image: Once the basic shape of the eye is specified, cells within the optic cup differentiate, populating the retina with neurons that sense light and refine the visual information before it is transmitted to the brain. In fish and amphibia, retinal stem cells are maintained throughout the animal’s lifetime in a stem cell niche located adjacent to the lens (yellow). Here in situ hybridization of a zebrafish eye (from a ~ 3-day-old larva) reveals gene expression patterns that distinguish retinal stem cells (red) from the cells that are becoming neurons (purple). By comparing gene expression patterns within the retinal stem cell niche in normal and mutant eyes, we gain insight into how stem cells turn into neurons.

Eyes are not only amazingly complex, but are reducibly so!

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