Posts from the ‘cool’ Category

150 years of hurricanes and their paths, strengths. Kinda hard to see at first glance, but you’re looking from the South Pole. Most of Mexico and the southern US are obscured completely.

Duuuuuude!

quantumaniac:

First Practical Maser (Microwave Laser) Built

Using spare chemicals, a laser bought on eBay and angst from a late-night argument, physicists have got the world’s first room-temperature microwave laser working. The achievement comes nearly 60 years after the first clunky versions of such devices were built, and could revolutionize communication and space exploration. The work is published this week in Nature.

Before there were lasers, there were microwave lasers, or masers. First conceived in the Soviet Union and the United States during the 1950s, early maser machines were the size of a chest of drawers. They produced only a few nanowatts of power, severely limiting their usefulness.

Because of this impediment, most in the field gave up on masers and moved on to lasers, which use the same principles of physics, but work with optical light instead of microwaves. Lasers are now used in applications ranging from eye surgery to CD players. The poor maser lived on in obscurity. It found only a few niche uses, such as boosting radio signals from distant spacecraft — including NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover. Those masers work only when cooled to less than ten degrees above absolute zero, and even then they are not nearly as powerful as lasers.

Pink power
But Mark Oxborrow, a physicist at the UK National Physical Laboratory in Teddington, wondered whether a crystal containing the organic molecule pentacene might offer a breakthrough. He came across a decade-old publication by Japaneseresearchers suggesting that when the electrons in pentacene are excited by a laser, they configure such that the molecule could work as a maser, possibly even at room temperature.

He borrowed some spare pentacene from a lab at Imperial, and cooked it with another organic molecule known as p-terphenyl. The result was a pink crystal a few centimeters long.

Next, the team needed a powerful laser. Oxborrow located an old medical laser on eBay and drove to a warehouse in north London to pick it up. But the researchers were filled with doubts — the whole thing seemed too easy. Oxborrow admits that he was skittish about the experiment. “For about three days, I could have done it, but I didn’t have the nerve to switch on that button,” he says.

The final impetus came from an argument with his wife. Whereas less well-behaved people might have wallowed in the pub, “I went to the lab as a bit of therapy”, says Oxborrow. “I said, ‘Oh well, what the hell, let’s just try it.” And it worked on the first go.

Excited state
The laser light excited the pentacene molecules to an energy level known as a metastable state. Then a microwave passing through the crystal triggered the molecules to relax, releasing a cascade of microwaves of the same wavelength.

It was the same principle as an optical laser. “The signal that came out of it was huge,” says Oxborrow, about a hundred million times as powerful as an existing maser. Alone in his lab, “I swore a lot and walked around the corridor about five times talking to myself”.

Left: New maser

Right: A Hydrogen Radio Frequency Discharge (early Maser)

Molten sulfur

discoverynews:

Warning: This is cool.

neurosciencestuff:

Researchers from the Senckenberg Research Institute in Frankfurt have revealed one of the oddest spiders ever discovered. The Sinopoda scurion is the first eyeless huntsman spider in the world.

‘I found the spider in a cave in Laos, around 100 kilometres away from the famous Xe Bang Fai cave,’ said Peter Jäger, head of the arachnology section at the Senckenberg Research Institute in Frankfurt. ‘We already knew of spiders of this genus from other caves, but they always had eyes and complete pigmentation.

The team believe the regression of the eyes is attributable to living permanently without daylight.

Creepy, but definitely cool. It’s like an arachnid Daredevil.

A look at the surfaces of some of our solar system neighbors.

quantumaniac:

Happy Birthday NASA! 

Today, July 29th, marks the 54th anniversary of the passage of the National Aeronautics and Space Act – which established NASA. Since February 2006, NASA’s mission statement has been to ”pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research.” NASA replaced its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The agency became operational on October 1, 1958.

Equilbrioception is also how we can sense acceleration and gravity. We also have chronoception, an inner sense of timing, which explains how you know it’s about 2:30 without checking. 

Other animals can sense water currents and pressure, as well as electric and magnetic fields, among other things. We too can sense magnetic fields to a degree – if you’re willing to get magnets placed in your fingertips.

Nature is amazing in the breadth of things for which it can adapt, and the way it does so.

Ask XKCD’s Randall Munroe “What would happen if…” and he’ll give you a detailed answer, complete with illustrations. Just started, only two are answered, but definitely worth checking out every few days.
This means that the odds of acing the SAT by guessing are worse than the odds of every living ex-President and every member of the main cast of Firefly all being independently struck by lightning … on the same day

I can’t stress how awesome XKCD’s new What If section is