Posts from the ‘environment’ Category

A beautiful map of the world’s rivers by National Geographic. It’s astounding to think that all of that only equates to less than 1% of the Earth’s water.

However, regardless of how much it appears to be, there are a whole lot of living things depending on it. Of them, only one is actively poisoning it for the rest of the biosphere and only one has the ability to clean it up. 

As we advance technologically our methods for fixing it are becoming more effective and less intrusive. At the same time, the amount of pollution being dumped is increasing also. 

While it would be great to develop a viable desalinization process, it’s not something we can count on any time soon. In the meantime, there are a diverse number of things you can do to help. Recycle, live more green, and use your rights as a citizen to elect representatives who understand and are willing to make the necessary changes to keep our water and environment safe.

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Following the common life cycle of many military technologies, drones are now being put to a more peaceful use: ecology. A growing movement is the utilization of drones and thermal-imaging to do everything from tracking illegal whaling ships, counting and protecting animal populations, and providing high-res photos of endangered habitats.

Nature finds a way.

sciencepopularis:

7000th amphibian characterised

According to AmphibiaWeb the ‘glass frog’ species centrolene sibini is the 7000th species of amphibian to be identified. Three of the seven thousand have been characterised since 1985; equivalent to a new species every three days. Amphibulous.

The Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology is compiling a different kind of sperm bank, one that can hopefully be used to save our coral reefs.

While coral can produce asexually, sexual reproduction is necessary for the corals’ genetic diversity to maintain a sustainable level. That’s why Dr. Mary Hagedorn is constantly adding to her stock of coral embryonic cells and sperm in her one-of-a-kind collection.

At the rate coral reefs are being destroyed or bleached, they will be well on their way to complete destruction by 2050. Hopefully, with the help of Dr. Hagedorn’s work, we can delay or even avoid the incident completely.

realcleverscience:

Gotta say, 85% of my motivation in blogging this is that I love that japanese painting.

Also, climate change!

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

I always remembered which way round it was with “Hot babes, cool dudes”. 

Noggin’. 

Fun fact: Alligators work the same way!