Posts from the ‘moon’ Category

quantumaniac:

RIP Neil Armstrong – First Man on the Moon

Neil Armstrong, the astronaut who became first to walk on the moon as commander of Apollo 11, has died. He was 82 years old.

He was born in the small town of Wapakoneta, Ohio, on Aug. 5, 1930.

On July 20, 1969, half a billion people — a sixth of the world’s population at the time — watched a ghostly black-and-white television image as Armstrong backed down the ladder of the lunar landing ship Eagle, planted his left foot on the moon’s surface, and said, “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Twenty minutes later his crewmate, Buzz Aldrin, joined him, and the world watched as the men spent the next two hours bounding around in the moon’s light gravity, taking rock samples, setting up experiments, and taking now-iconic photographs.

“Isn’t this fun?” Armstrong said over his radio link to Aldrin. The third member of the Apollo 11 crew, Michael L. Collins, orbited 60 miles overhead in the mission’s command ship, Columbia. President Richard Nixon called their eight-day trip to the moon “the greatest week in the history of the world since the Creation.”

Advertisements

A look at the surfaces of some of our solar system neighbors.

The American flag planted by Apollo 17 and its shadow on the moon. 

Fun fact: The original Apollo 11 flag was knocked over by the exhaust of the Eagle’s ascent module.

the-star-stuff:

NASA finds hidden ocean on Saturn’s moon Titan

Using incredibly precise measurements from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, researchers have concluded that Saturn’s biggest moon is likely hiding a global, sub-surface water ocean, 100 km beneath its surface.

Cassini has flown by Titan more than 80 times since entering Saturn’s orbit in 2004, and its observations have confirmed that, as moons go, Titan is a weird one. It’s bigger than the planet Mercury. It’s the only moon with a real atmosphere (an atmosphere denser than Earth’s, in fact). It experiences Earthlike weather, such as rain and snow. It’s home to familiar geological features like valleys, plains and deserts — and it’s the only known object besides Earth with standing bodies of liquid.

The researchers’ findings are published in the latest issue of Science

expose-the-light:

What if the moon had never formed?

Credit: Karl Tate / Life’s Little Mysteries

Huge tides generated by the moon – which orbited much closer to Earth when it formed – washed the chemical building blocks for life from land into the oceans and helped stir up the primordial soup. Without it, life may never have arisen, or living things would have very different behavioral patterns to cope with the six-hour day and extreme climate changes that would exist on a moonless Earth. [Get the full explanation]

crownedrose:

Solar Eclipse Live Feed from California via SLOOH

I did a few screen caps and made a gif from the live feed from events.slooh.com where you can catch the last minutes of the solar eclipse.

jtotheizzoe:

itsfullofstars:

Lunar orbit rendezvous

You can tell these are rocket scientists because they can draw nearly perfect rectangles and circles on the chalkboard.

To the moon and back in 10 steps! It looks so easy.