Posts from the ‘ocean’ Category

the-star-stuff:

Rare Deep-Sea Anglerfish Recorded

Floating around deep-sea rocks like a watery version of French filmmaker Albert Lamorisse’s red balloon, this bulbous, brightly colored anglerfish was recorded by a remotely operated submarine camera off of California’s Central Coast in 2010.

Images courtesy MBARI

Duuuuuude!

The Forest of Pillars in Egypt’s Sinai Desert. Many believe the tubes were formed by lava, however it seems more likely to be ancient hydrothermal vents.

Dr. Bonnie Sampsell states: 

“The rocks are composed of hematite (a form of iron oxide). The iron oxide was dissolved out of the sandstone bedrock, to which it imparts a reddish colour, by hot water emerging from deep in the earth. As the water reached the surface and cooled, the iron oxide precipitated in a ring around each source, forming a tube.”

braingels:

Marrus orthocanna, a deep sea siphonophore. The combined digestive and circulatory system is red; all other parts are transparent.

Nature finds a way.

The Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology is compiling a different kind of sperm bank, one that can hopefully be used to save our coral reefs.

While coral can produce asexually, sexual reproduction is necessary for the corals’ genetic diversity to maintain a sustainable level. That’s why Dr. Mary Hagedorn is constantly adding to her stock of coral embryonic cells and sperm in her one-of-a-kind collection.

At the rate coral reefs are being destroyed or bleached, they will be well on their way to complete destruction by 2050. Hopefully, with the help of Dr. Hagedorn’s work, we can delay or even avoid the incident completely.