Posts from the ‘SpaceX’ Category

Here’s a video of one of the Merlin rockets being tested!

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Our past and our future: Explorer and SpaceX’s Falcon 9.

Explorer is the mock shuttle that people could walk through at Kennedy Space Center, but it still represents an era where space exploration was only done at extreme costs by government agencies. The Falcon 9 represents a much more affordable, privatized, and commercialized future for spacecraft. I can’t wait to see what the private sector puts out in the next few decades; if the advertising is anything to go by (stretching, I know), there is a whole lot to look forward too!

Boing Boing reader Michael Smith-Welch shares this image, and says,

Why did I see so many binders (presumably filled with paper) on the desks of the engineers at NASA’s Mission control yesterday when they were docking SpaceX’s Dragon module to the Space Station?

In contrast, the SpaceX folks had (almost) none at there mission control center. The only conclusion I can draw from this is that the government agency is so riddled with bureaucracy that everything must be followed “by the book” so to speak. But this seems simple minded to me.

Yup.

It looks like a 20 year difference between the two!

jtotheizzoe:

lookhigh:

A ‘Picture Perfect’ Launch

Looking like a bright star streaking up into a black sky, a rocket took off before dawn today from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying an unmanned capsule filled with food, clothes, and other supplies for astronauts on the international space station.

But this robotic cargo ship doesn’t belong to NASA. Instead, it’s owned by a company called SpaceX, which made history by launching the first ever private spacecraft on a mission to the station.

SpaceX has a $1.6 billion cargo-delivery contract with NASA, which is turning routine flights to the station over to industry so that the veteran space agency can start to focus on more ambitious exploration efforts. (NPR)

Photo: Historic @SpaceX #DragonLaunch to ISS. @NASA on Twitpic

This is a landmark moment in space travel. With the entry of private firms into the public space game, NASA not only ensures continued support for ISS projects, but can turn their resources to missions above and beyond near-earth orbit. 

This is the kind of progress that lets NASA worry less about meeting a bottom line or boldly going where we’ve gone many times before, and instead lets them start thinking about what’s next.

lookhigh:

A ‘Picture Perfect’ Launch

Looking like a bright star streaking up into a black sky, a rocket took off before dawn today from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying an unmanned capsule filled with food, clothes, and other supplies for astronauts on the international space station.

But this robotic cargo ship doesn’t belong to NASA. Instead, it’s owned by a company called SpaceX, which made history by launching the first ever private spacecraft on a mission to the station.

SpaceX has a $1.6 billion cargo-delivery contract with NASA, which is turning routine flights to the station over to industry so that the veteran space agency can start to focus on more ambitious exploration efforts. (NPR)

Photo: Historic @SpaceX #DragonLaunch to ISS. @NASA on Twitpic

This seems relatively understated. But I think it’s going to be one of those things you tell your grandchildren: “I was there when the first private spaceship launched.”

theweekmagazine:

An engineer for the space exploration company SpaceX has outlined an elaborate plan to build Star Trek’s USS Enterprise, which he says could be ready to fly within the next 20 years.

“We have the technological reach to build the first generation of the spaceship… so let’s do it,” writes BTE Dan on his website, BuildTheEnterprise.org (which has been loading intermittently because of heavy traffic). 

The website includes conceptual blueprints, budgeting proposals, a timeline for research and development, and almost every other conceivable detail.

Could they actually pull this off?

Sounds like a really cool project. Is it really practical enough to justify though?