Posts tagged ‘physics’








sciencesoup:

Primal Trails

When the worlds of art and science collide, inspiration sometimes strikes in the sparks. Artist Roshan Houshmand creates a new perspective on the world of particle physics through her paintings, transforming physics into art. The paintings are based on the tracks of subatomic particles through bubble chambers, which are one of many kinds of detectors in particle accelerators designed to track particle movements. Bubble chambers are filled with superheated liquid, and the charged particles boil the liquid as they race through and leave a trail of bubbles behind. These compellingly beautiful patterns inspired Houshmand to create her series of ‘Event Paintings’. “I loved the sophisticated, simple playfulness of lines depicting charges, energies, speeds, mass and so much more,” Houshmand says. “There is something so pure and primal and universal about the movement of the trails and swirls and dancing lines against the black, which exist for less than a breath of time before they disappear.”

(Image Credit)

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Universes inflating, expanding and separating from a vast multiverse membrane on an vertical timeline

The Solar System shown on 3 proportional tiers with the inner planets magnified at the top

Large Hadron Collider, Quarks and the elusive Higgs Boson

A fountain of dark energy in space around a galactic body

A Black hole engine that might be at the centre of the Milky Way galaxy

Waves of dark energy flowing within a young star nursery

No description

A field of dark matter and energy

The play of light and dark matter around a sun

A solar body falling into a black hole and disappearing beyond its event horizon

staceythinx:

Illustrations by Moonrunner

About Moonrunner:

Moonrunner is primarily known for its science-based illustrations, especially in such fields as astro-physics, cosmology, dark energy, black holes, the solar system and such stellar phenomena as quasars, star nurseries and pulsars. We have worked with Stephen Hawking, as well as with the scientist/authors of the National Geographic and Scientific American magazines, and also those publishing with Dorling Kindersley, Weidenfeld & Nicolson and Weldon Owen.

Click on the images to see what they represent.

These are pretty trippy, and are definitely great for visualizing what may be happening during certain cosmic events. Just remember that these aren’t actual representation, and most of this is largely invisible for humans without the use of filters. 

Astounding nonetheless. I especially love the the multiverse one at the top.

jtotheizzoe:

Acoustic Levitation of Liquids? What Wizardry Be This?

High-frequency acoustic signals interfere to create a standing wave, allowing liquids to “levitate” at the nodes, where the two acoustic forces cancel out each other and gravity.

In other words, whoa.

(via PsiVid)

Dark Matter In Rap Form

jtotheizzoe:

Coma Niddy drops the knowledge on ya about something funky in the universe. Download the tune here.

Please continue to make fun science raps for me, everyone.

“The universe is like bread and dark matter is the cheese.”

(by comaniddy)

The more science raps there are, the more awesome the world is. True fact.


ikenbot:

How to Build a Planet: Heavy Metals Are Key Ingredients

Image: An artist conception of a newly formed star surrounded by a swirling protoplanetary disk of dust and gas, where debris coalesces to create rocky ‘planetesimals’ that collide and grow to eventually form planets. A new study suggests small rocky planet may actually be widespread in our Milky Way galaxy. Credit: University of Copenhagen, Lars A. Buchhave

Planets may not be able to form without a heaping helping of heavy elements such as silicon, titanium and magnesium, a new study suggests.

Stars that host planets have higher concentrations of such “metals” — astronomer-speak for elements heavier than hydrogen and helium — compared to iron than do planetless stars, the study found.

“To form planets, one needs heavy elements,” said lead author Vardan Adibekyan, of the Centre for Astrophysics of the University of Porto in Portugal.

Connected at birth

Planets coalesce from the disk of dust and gas left over after the birth of their parent star. According to the leading theory of planet formation, the core accretion model, small particles clump together, growing larger and larger until they produce protoplanets.

Scientists have long suspected that stars with higher metallicities are more likely to have planets orbiting them. Iron has long been a primary indicator.

“Usually, in stellar physics, people use the iron content as a proxy of overall metallicity,”

Full Article

ikenbot:

How to Build a Planet: Heavy Metals Are Key Ingredients

Image: An artist conception of a newly formed star surrounded by a swirling protoplanetary disk of dust and gas, where debris coalesces to create rocky ‘planetesimals’ that collide and grow to eventually form planets. A new study suggests small rocky planet may actually be widespread in our Milky Way galaxy. Credit: University of Copenhagen, Lars A. Buchhave

Planets may not be able to form without a heaping helping of heavy elements such as silicon, titanium and magnesium, a new study suggests.

Stars that host planets have higher concentrations of such “metals” — astronomer-speak for elements heavier than hydrogen and helium — compared to iron than do planetless stars, the study found.

“To form planets, one needs heavy elements,” said lead author Vardan Adibekyan, of the Centre for Astrophysics of the University of Porto in Portugal.

Connected at birth

Planets coalesce from the disk of dust and gas left over after the birth of their parent star. According to the leading theory of planet formation, the core accretion model, small particles clump together, growing larger and larger until they produce protoplanets.

Scientists have long suspected that stars with higher metallicities are more likely to have planets orbiting them. Iron has long been a primary indicator.

“Usually, in stellar physics, people use the iron content as a proxy of overall metallicity,”

Full Article


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Abstruse Goose